303 Street Style – A Tribute to Black Girl Magic

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The Museum for Black Girls’ “A Tribute to Black Girl Magic” event over the weekend was a love letter to black girls everywhere. This vibrant, interactive multi-room experience was a celebration for melanin, natural hair and black girl magic. From Yara to Lupita, the museum represented every black woman. Keisha Marie, co-founder of Black Creatives Weekends explained, “We want to showcase the journey of black women embracing our beauty, our history and our magic. It all started in salons in grandma’s kitchen.”

The museum, which was held at Elevate Fashion & Lifestyle boutique, took us on a journey through the world of being a black woman. From the battle with hot combs and embracing natural hair to exploring important moments and figures in black women’s history, the museum gave insight into a black woman’s world. This was Charlie Billingsley’s vision because for her it is important to create a space for her women.

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The women there took notice of this vision and the purpose behind the museum. Attendee, Kanesha Ross, said, “Black women in the media are usually angry and hostile. It’s good to be in space where we are celebrating our beauty and elegance.” Spaces such as this help women in the Denver community connect with each other, making a way for them to support one another.

“To me, being a black woman means freedom. Freedom to be exactly how goddess intended me to be,” Yazz Atmore.

“To me being a black woman means to be authentic and a source to find creativity, to be a backbone for our community. Having that title is an honor. We are magical. We are unstoppable,” Shakerra Monet.

“Being a black woman in America means being genuinely and authentically yourself and realizing that doing everything right may not be enough, but you are enough,” Eejipt Burgess.

“To be a black woman is to exude grace and set the tone for the world. We are magic,” Keisha Marie, co-founder of Black Creatives Weekends.

“Being a Black woman means pulling up my own seat at the table when no one else will give us a seat. It means magic, beauty, essence all of the things and I am so proud to be a black woman,” Charlie Billingsley, (left) event founder.

“It means love and hope. It means strength, it means victory, it means courage,” LaVonya Washington.

All photography by Brandon Johnson.