Judge orders mental competency exam for Pueblo man charged with threats to Cory Gardner

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DENVER — U.S. District Court Judge Raymond Moore has ordered a Pueblo man who is charged with threatening to kill former U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner and sheriff’s deputies to undergo a mental competency examination.

“There is reasonable cause to believe that Thomas Arthur Wornick may presently be suffering from a mental disease or defect rendering him mentally incompetent to the extent that he is unable to understand the nature and consequences of the proceedings against him or to assist properly in his defense,” the judge wrote.

He issued the order Friday in Denver, where the case against Wornick, 37, is pending on a charge of using interstate communication, the emails, to make a threat.

Authorities arrested Wornick on March 9, the same day he allegedly sent an email to Gardner’s office stating: “In 2003 I deployed to Iraq, I was blown up by an ied in my hmmwv and blown up again by a rocket weeks later. I suffer everyday of my life. I am going to kill senator cory gardner for refusing to help me get medical care.”

“I sarficied my whole (expletive) life for this nation, and this nation refuses to give medical care for my combat injuries,” he allegedly wrote in the email.

MORE: Man accused of threatening Gardner, Pueblo deputies needs mental exam, his attorney says

An affidavit for Wornick’s arrest quotes an email Worwick allegedly sent to several people on the same day: “I will use my skill the u.s. government trained me and I will hunt down and kill every pueblo sheriff deputy the true enemy of the people.”

The email lists tnames of three deputies who responded to a July 4, 2019 incident in Pueblo West on a report of a disorderly man, who turned out to be Wornick.

The affidavit stated that friends of Wornick told investigators he probably would shoot law enforcement officers if they came to his home.

A sheriff’s detective obtained a warrant to search Wornick’s home and found rifles and ammunition, the affidavit states.

MORE: Treatment delayed in threats case