Sustainable Streetwear Brand False Ego Returns to Denver Fashion Week

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Designer Jevon Taylor is on a mission to make sustainable fashion mainstream. He is the owner of False Ego, a Denver streetwear brand with a flagship in RiNo / Five Points. The name comes from the concept that ego can get in the way of a person’s connection with the world around them. In this case, the frayed connection is with nature. 

“Our logo is a fragmented pyramid. I think each one of those pieces represents us: A smaller piece needed to create the whole. The foundation of our brand is about connecting consumers to their communities and the environment,” said Taylor. 

False Ego returns to Denver Fashion Week 2021 for Day Five: Sustainable Fashion. As a reminder of the inherent connection people have to earth and nature, the collection embraces earth tones and intricate geo-patterns. Taylor harnesses his creativity to create the brand’s graphic design. Designer Ryan Perry takes the lead on clothing design and construction. 

Purchase Tickets for DFW

After oil and gas, fashion is the second highest polluter in the world. A single pair of denim jeans requires over 1,800 gallons of water to construct. Taylor created False Ego to combat fast fashion through means of production and cultural influence. False Ego houses street and loungewear for those who like to be comfortable while wearing pieces that stand out.

“I wanted to create a dynamic company that connected consumers to a bigger picture of sustainability. [Our brand] is essential gear. Every year, people want their hoodies, sweatpants and backpacks,” said Taylor.

DFW 2021 Collection: Sneak Peek

False Ego, Five Points, RiNo, Ryan Perry, Ellie Sullum, Roxanna Carrasco

False Ego’s DFW collection focuses on unisex streetwear with a few ready to wear designs. Muted tones of grey, blue and orange are reminiscent of mountains and desert — think the Continental Divide meets Great Sand Dunes National Park.

The collection’s palette is certainly earth inspired, but localized to Colorado. False Ego’s pieces might remind someone of hikes and camping trips they’ve taken in the Rockies or of beautiful walks in City Park.  

Per the brand’s commitment to sustainability, Taylor makes product transparency a top priority. Consumers can easily read about their supply chain on False Ego’s website.

“I try to promote product transparency through our brand — not just through the products themselves, but making [transparency] cool. I think a lot of Eco-friendly brands are just cookie cutter. You know, you get the same kind of garment, same colors. We try to create clothes that are cooler to wear, because we want to make sustainability cool, rather than an alternative lifestyle,” said Taylor.

Building Community and Catalyzing Action

Ryan Perry, Jevon Taylor, RiNo, Five Points, Roxanna Carrasco, Ellie Sullum

False Ego remains committed to leading the movement of companies and consumers moving away from fast fashion. Their clothing is 100% cotton and sourced from SUPIMA certified companies. SUPIMA cotton has standards for material sourcing and labor conditions.

“[Product transparency] is extremely important. I think it’s beautiful that it’s a trend to care about where your products come from. Previously, the exploitation of the fashion industry was swept under the rug. People are starting to become more aware of the impact that old ways of consumption have on our world,” said Taylor.

False Ego prides itself in cultivating a vibrant local community. With a physical storefront, they have the opportunity to bring creatives together for gatherings and events.

“Clothing’s historically been used to congregate community. I think our store serves as a check point for a lot of people in Denver. It’s a cool place to build community; we’ve hosted a lot of community events and try to be a community resource,” said Taylor.

For Taylor, environmental sustainability goes beyond fashion and lifestyle and takes root in transformative community action. He wants to see his vision realized through False Ego’s Habitat Restoration Project.

Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to suffer from lack of green space. Five Points, Taylor pointed out, is largely concrete. Residents have few opportunities to experience nature or recreate in green areas. The Habitat Restoration Project partners with the National Wildlife Foundation, Denver Botanic Gardens, CU Denver and EDENS to fund outdoor space creation in Five Points. Taylor currently works with community members in Five Points to support them in developing advocacy skills to lobby Colorado elected officials.

False Ego Returns to Denver Fashion Week

Ryan Perry, RiNo, Five Points, Roxanna Carrasco, Denver Fashion Week, Ellie Sullum

False Ego is participating in Denver Fashion Week for the second time; their first appearance was in 2019. “Participating in Denver Fashion week will help me grow as a designer,” said Perry; it will be his first Denver Fashion Week.

“I think it’s really exciting; [our brand] is an unconventional pick for Denver Fashion Week, which makes showcasing special,” said Aubri Romero, Team Member at False Ego. 

Purchase tickets for Denver Fashion Week Day Five: Sustainable Fashion on Sunday, November 21 at McNichols Civic Center.

All photos by Roxanna Carrasco